Speech & Inclusion Series

The “2018 Speech and Inclusion: Recognizing Conflict and Building Tools for Engagement” series invites students, faculty and staff to openly discuss, listen, and engage with differing views on free speech and to advocate for voices that have historically been silenced — important issues that continue to challenge both our campus and the nation.

Sponsored by several U-M units and part of overall Diversity, Equity & Inclusion efforts on campus, this series of events explores how views about speech and inclusion play out in politics, culture, higher education, sports and journalism, and how to engage in productive conversations that can promote a positive campus environment and help the community more deeply understand these complicated issues.

Michigan Theater, 7 p.m.

Documentary film screening and Q&A with executive producer Maziar Bahari, founder of Not A Crime, a campaign that raises awareness of human rights violations, including the denial of freedom of expression and access to education. The film tells the story of renowned street artists painting giant murals in five continents to expose the systemic discrimination against Baha’is, Iran’s largest religious minority and other populations around the world. Bahari is an Iranian-Canadian journalist who was imprisoned in Iran. myumi.ch/JgV28

Rackham Auditorium, 6-7:30 p.m.

Join NPR’s daily radio show, “1A,” for a special event, Speak Freely: Debating the First Amendment in a Changing America. Host Joshua Johnson and his guests will examine the first amendment, free speech and what it means in a divided America. Experience the show and participate in the national conversation. myumi.ch/aVoM4

Mendelssohn Theater, 4-5:30 p.m.

Wallace House presents New York Times columnist and Livingston Awards judge Bret Stephens for a provocative discussion titled “Free Speech and the Necessity of Discomfort.myumi.ch/6kMgX

Free speech on college campuses has gained national attention because of the varying views held by individuals to protect or ban speech that is offensive, discriminatory, and hateful, and which has implications for an inclusive learning environment. This Teach-Out will prompt participants to think critically about the role free speech plays on university campuses and how this discourse shapes the broader narrative about free speech protection across the United States. myumi.ch/6nVx3.

Hosted by the U-M Women of Color Task Force (WCTF), this inclusive professional development conference is open to all U-M staff, faculty, students and the public, regardless of gender or ethnicity. The keynote speaker will be April Ryan, American Urban Radio Networks DC bureau chief, who will discuss free speech and the greater good. The opening keynote address will begin promptly at 8:30 a.m. in Hill Auditorium. The keynote is free and open to the public. Information about registration fees to attend the conference sessions and networking luncheon is available on the CEW website. Conference attendees may choose from 21 workshops designed to support their professional and personal development. myumi.ch/JNoQN

A free press is essential for a healthy, vibrant, and democratic society. Yet public trust in journalism has hit historic lows in recent years and journalists are being openly questioned. This Teach-Out will prompt participants to think critically about the roles and responsibilities of journalists in a free society and the implications of a restricted and diminished press. myumi.ch/6nVx3.

There is a growing debate on what constitutes free speech and what is protected speech under the First Amendment, particularly within the context of sports and athletics. This Teach-Out will prompt participants to think critically about the institution of sport, and how sport is a contested terrain in contemporary society with respect to free speech. myumi.ch/6nVx3.

Palmer Commons, Great Lakes Room, 5 p.m.

The panel discussion will feature higher education leaders from across the country who will engage the audience in the complexities related to creating more inclusive campus communities while simultaneously honoring the principles of free expression.