| Resources

U-M Programs and Resources Addressing Issues Facing African Americans

The following are U-M programs, resources initiatives, and activities that are, as part of their mission, addressing issues that face the African American community at U-M Ann Arbor.  We invite you to get to know these programs better and to engage with them. We still have significantly more work to do. If there’s a U-M program, initiative, and/or activity that you are aware of that is not listed or you can’t find what you’re looking for, please contact diversitymatters@umich.edu.


Resource Lists


By Constituent


Faculty/Community
Campus Visit Program (CVP)

Campus Visit Program (community): Tailored and impactful campus visits for underserved K-12 schools or community-based organizations promoting college access and success who want to cultivate higher education aspiration and academic achievement.

Detroit Urban Research Center

Detroit Urban Research Center (faculty and community): A partnership that equitably engages U-M researchers, community-based organizations, and health service institutions who are passionate about collaborative research, public health policy formation, programs, information dissemination, and translation, and education – aimed at achieving health equity in Detroit.

  • Engaged Learning
    • Detroit Connector (Community): The Detroit Connector provides transportation between Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Detroit in support of curricular, co-curricular, research, https://www.urbanlab.umich.edu/service-learning, and other community-engaged opportunities. The Connector also facilitates cultural enrichment, enabling residents of Southeastern Michigan to better utilize the region’s rich arts and scholarly resources. The service is available to U-M faculty, staff, and students, as well as the general public.
    • U-M Detroit Center (UMDC) (Community): The University of Michigan Detroit Center provides a visible symbol of our 200-year relationship with the City of Detroit. Conveniently located in the heart of the city’s cultural center on Woodward Avenue, the Center is a gateway for University and urban communities to mutually enrich each other through service, education, research, and cultural exchange.
Inclusive Teaching Institute

Inclusive Teaching Initiative (faculty): The initiative’s aim is to build faculty skill in and commitment to cultivating learning environments where students of all backgrounds and identities are welcomed, feel valued, and are equitably supported in their academic success.  Each school and college has appointed a faculty member to be a liaison for inclusive teaching.

Institute for Social Research

Institute for Social Research (Community/Students/Faculty):

  • Program for Research on Black Americans (Faculty): Since its establishment in 1976, the Program for Research on Black Americans (PRBA) has been the leader in creating new and innovative qualitative and quantitative research methods to understand the lives of African American and African descendant communities. Our mission is to generate high-quality data, analyses, and interpretations of findings to advance academic scholarship and develop effective public policies.
  • Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research (Faculty): MCUAAAR is one of 18 Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research across the nation tasked with improving the health of older minorities through research, scholarship and education. The University Research Corridor (URC) is an alliance of Michigan’s three leading research institutions: Michigan State University, the University of Michigan, and Wayne State University. The URC plays a key role in leveraging the intellectual capital of its three public research universities. African Americans have significantly higher rates than Caucasians of diabetes, stroke, heart disease, high blood pressure, and certain cancers as they age.
  • Youth Policy Lab (Community): The University of Michigan Youth Policy Lab helps the community and government agencies make better decisions by measuring what really works. We’re data experts who believe that the government can and must do better for the people of Michigan. We’re also parents and community members who dream of a brighter future for all of our children. At the Youth Policy Lab, we’re working to make that dream a reality by strengthening programs that address some of our most pressing social challenges.
  • Center for Inequality Dynamics (Faculty, Students): CID is an open and multidisciplinary research center, bringing together students and faculty from a variety of fields, including sociology, economics, public policy, social work, philosophy, education, and others. It pursues cutting-edge research and innovative teaching on one of the central societal challenges of our time: social inequality.
Michigan College Advising Corps

Michigan College Advising Corps (Community): A diverse group of recent University of Michigan graduates working full-time as college advisers in under-served high schools throughout Michigan. To address the widening gap in college preparation, counseling, and programming, advisers help students navigate every aspect of the college-going process and identify their personal best fit among various post-secondary options.

Michigan Radio Detroit Journalism Cooperative

Michigan Radio Detroit Journalism Cooperative (Community): The Detroit Journalism Cooperative is an integrated community media network providing insight into the issues facing Detroit. It features two radio stations, an online magazine, five ethnic newspapers, and a public television station– All working together to tell the story of Detroit.

Network to Advance Faculty of Color

Network to Advance Faculty of Color (faculty): A collaboration between the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the ADVANCE Program. It was created in 2015 with the hope that opportunities to meet and share experiences would be valuable. They meet several times a year, allowing network members to get to know one another and define institutional goals.

Poverty Solutions

Poverty Solutions (faculty and community) An initiative that aims to prevent and alleviate poverty through action-based research that informs policymakers, community organizations, government entities, and practitioners about what works in confronting poverty.

  • Partnership on Economic Mobility (PDF): Poverty Solutions and the City of Detroit is a joint effort to identify and implement concrete, evidence-based strategies that significantly improve economic opportunity and reduce poverty in Detroit. Partnership projects already are underway pairing dozens of U-M experts with the leadership of city departments including health, workforce, housing and revitalization, jobs and economy, and police.
  • Summer Youth Employment Program: The University of Michigan is an active partner in SummerWorks, the Washtenaw County Summer Youth Employment Program, 10-week summer employment, and a mentorship program that pairs employers with local youth to provide on-the-job training. SummerWorks connects youth to resources for building professional networks, exploring career opportunities, and developing essential job and leadership skills.
Brightmoor Makerspace

Brightmoor Makerspace (Community): A collaboration between Detroit Community Schools and the U-M Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, the Brightmoor Maker Space opened in 2018, transforming a formerly vacant 3,200 square-foot building into a place for youth and adults to build their creative making skills and incubate business ideas.

School of Education
  • The School at Marygrove (external community, students, faculty): a P-20 collaboration with Detroit Public Schools serves the Detroit community as well as novice teachers from the U-M School of Education.
  • School of Education & Detroit School of Arts Partnership (external community, faculty): The Detroit Public Schools and the University of Michigan work as partners to support and enhance new and ongoing arts programming at Detroit School of Arts.
School of Public Health
  • Detroit Urban Research Center (Community/Faculty): It is a “partnership that equitably engages U-M researchers, community-based organizations, and health service institutions who are passionate about collaborative research, public health policy formation, programs, information dissemination, and translation, and education – aimed at achieving health equity in Detroit”.
  • Community Action to Promote Healthy Environments (CAPHE) (Community/Faculty): “CAPHE builds on 20 years of community-academic research partnerships. Members from these long-standing partnerships serve on CAPHE’s Steering Committee, and are responsible for building and implementing CAPHE’s Public Health Action Plan….This structure promotes collaboration and shared decision making at all levels of the CAPHE project, ensuring Detroit residents will have a significant voice in identifying and creating solutions to Detroit’s air pollution problems.”
Women of Color in the Academy Project

Women of Color in the Academy Project (faculty): A campus-wide faculty network at U-M that supports scholarship focused on understanding the experiences of women of color in the academy and advocacy work to address the challenges and issues faced uniquely by women of color in the academy.

Wolverine Pathways

Wolverine Pathways (Community): A free, year-round program that partners with the families, schools, and communities of Detroit, Southfield, and Ypsilanti. This partnership provides learning experiences that will help students succeed in school, college and future careers.  All students who successfully complete the program, apply to U-M, and are admitted, receive a full, 4-yr. tuition scholarship.

U-M Library

U-M Library Online Exhibit: The History of Race at U-M (Community)

Summer Youth Dialogues

Summer Youth Dialogues (community and students): Summer Youth Dialogues, sponsored by the Program on Intergroup Relations, “increases dialogue among high school age youth in metropolitan Detroit, the nation’s most segregated metropolitan area. Young people of African, Asian, European, Latinx/a/o, and Middle Eastern descent participate in structured dialogues, metropolitan tour, campus retreat, and community projects that increase dialogue, challenge discrimination, and create change”.

School of Social Work
  • ENGAGE: DETROIT (Faculty/Staff/Students): The ENGAGE: DETROIT Initiative exists to identify nodes of strength, highlight faculty research, celebrate student achievements, and promote class-related projects and service in the city of Detroit. Faculty, staff, and students contribute their expertise, time, and other resources to support the ongoing efforts of Detroiters and community-based organizations to strengthen their neighborhoods and improve the quality of life for residents of the city. The initiative also features an event that celebrates and showcases student engagement in Detroit. During the event, students network and build relationships with community organizations, leaders, activists, elected officials, and others in the community.
  • Cody Rouge Community Action Alliance (Community): The mission of the Cody Rouge Community Alliance is to revitalize and sustain a healthy community where residents have access to and promote a high quality of life. The Cody Rouge Community Action Alliance does work in three categories: Community Engagement creates pathways for the citizens of Cody Rouge to participate in community improvements, educational opportunities, resource distribution, and leadership development; for Youth Development, the Cody Rouge Youth Council provides a space for young people from the neighborhood to engage in leadership development, community service, and work-readiness training; for Neighborhood Revitalization, the alliance partners with community members and organizations to improve and enhance our neighborhoods by removing blight, increasing lighting, keeping residents in their homes, and more. 
  • REACH Detroit Partnership (Community): REACH stands for Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health. REACH provides a community-driven approach to preventing diabetes and its related conditions and improving quality of life through partnerships and collaborations. REACH informs, educates, and empowers families, communities, and healthcare providers to prevent or better manage diabetes through one-on-one relationships, support groups, and community-wide healthy lifestyle activities. REACH works in several African American and Hispanic communities in the city of Detroit.
  • Urban Neighborhood Initiatives (Community): Urban Neighborhood Initiatives is a nonprofit organization rooted in Southwest Detroit. We work within the community to be able to create a safe and thriving environment where people want to live, work, and play. UNI is based in the Springwells area of Southwest Detroit, a 1.3 square mile neighborhood bounded by Fort, Dix, and Waterman Streets. ​UNI aims to make the community a better place for the residents by offering great opportunities to the youth and their families. UNI currently focuses on 3 different areas of work:  Youth Development, Education, and Land Use & Economic Development.
School of Public Policy
  • Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Program (Community/Faculty/Student/Staff): The Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Project (DNEP) is dedicated to promoting sustainable economic and community development in Detroit by providing technical and strategic consulting services to neighborhood-based entrepreneurs and small businesses. DNEP was founded in 2016. By engaging the University of Michigan students, faculty, and staff, we provide solutions to the complex needs of our Detroit-based clients.
  • Practical Policy Engagement (P3E) (Student/Faculty): The Practical Policy Engagement Program is a university-wide resource housed at the Ford School where it can leverage existing expertise and interdisciplinary approaches to generate policy-relevant research, analysis, and learning, as well as improvements in organizational practice.
School of Kinesiology

School of Kinesiology

  • Center for Race and Ethnicity in Sport (faculty, community) C-REAS focuses on research for and about the Black community as constituents of sports (i.e., athletes, fans, sports leaders, HBCU sports). 
  • Childhood Disparities Research Lab (faculty, community) conducts research that addresses race, health disparities and inequities in African American communities along with other communities of color.

School of Public Health

  • Healthy Environments Partnership  (faculty, community) HEP is a community-academic partnership committed to fostering health equity in Detroit since 2000.
  • Prevention Research Center  (faculty/community) The Prevention Research Center promotes safe and healthy futures through prevention research. The Center conducts community-based research with a focus on youth and adolescents and reducing health disparities in communities with a disproportionate share of poor health outcomes. 
  • Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health (faculty, community) CRECH is committing to conducting research focused on reducing racial and ethnic disparities in health and training research scientists from groups that have been historically underrepresented in leadership roles in public health.
  • Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health (CSEPH) (faculty, community) For over 20 years, the CSEPH has been investigating how social, psychological, political and economic factors contribute to health and health inequalities. It sponsors a regular seminar series and special events as part of its mission to disseminate research to a wide audience. 
  • Youth Violence Prevention Center (faculty, community) MI-YVPC conducts numerous projects focused on reducing youth violence. One is studying the effects of vacant property improvements on violence, property crimes and intentional injuries in three U.S. cities: Flint, Michigan, Youngstown, Ohio and Camden, New Jersey. The Center is focusing on supporting work that engages residents, particularly youth, in caring for properties in their neighborhoods by mowing, planting gardens, or doing other “greening” activities. It is assessing whether involving community youth and adults in greening reduces violence to a greater degree than either professional greening or no maintenance. 
Rackham Graduate School

Rackham Graduate School

  • Research Exchange (faculty) is a federally funded anti-racist intervention to increase the diversity of STEM faculty, in collaboration with other universities, such as Harvard, Stanford, Cal, and Cal Tech. At the University of Michigan, RMF eligibility criteria are used to nominate participants. 
  • Faculty Allies & Student Allies Grant Competition (faculty, students) awardees do DEI and anti-racism work.
  • Creating Connection Consortium (C3) (faculty) Along with institutions like UC Berkeley, Columbia, and the University of Chicago, Rackham belongs to C3, a Mellon Foundation-funded consortium that aims to increase diverse participation in graduate studies in order to diversify the pipeline of future faculty members.
  • LEADING EQUITY AND DIVERSITY (L.E.A.D.) (students, faculty, community) Rackham will be offering one webinar a month in an ongoing program to invite conscious leading in higher education
  • The Detroit School (Students, Community, Faculty):Since 2015, the “Detroit School” series has continued on as a Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop. The workshop invites experts and researchers from around the country to share their experiences in and in-progress research on Detroit and cities facing similar disinvestment and decline. The workshops have included panel discussions on what it means to “Teach Detroit” in higher education classrooms, book launches for Rebecca Kinney, Amy Haimerl, and Tiya Miles, a symposium on how Michigan cities are positioning themselves for the next century, and talks on community-based design and avenues to maintain residents’ rights to the city. The workshop also organizes doctoral student writing workshops for students writing dissertations on Detroit.”
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
  • Michigan Architecture Prep (community): A program hosted by Taubman College introducing high school juniors from Detroit Public Schools to the discipline of architecture through an immersive, semester-long college preparatory course on architecture, urbanism, and integrated design studio practices.
  • Detroit Community Partnership Center at Taubman College (faculty and students): Supports student and faculty projects that address community-identified needs and advance the education and knowledge building mission of the University of Michigan. Projects aim to support the work of Detroit community leaders and city officials who are working to strengthen neighborhoods in Detroit. Community organizing helped stabilize neighborhoods after the mortgage crisis- U-SNAP-BAC, Vacant Property Task Force of the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation.
  • ArcStart (community): ArcStart is a three-week-long residential program for high school students that offers students the opportunity to explore the built environment firsthand through an introduction to architectural design. Participants will experience the rewarding intensity of an engaging college architecture studio, partake in skill-building workshops that reinforce analytical and conceptual problem-solving skills, and visit architecturally significant projects in Ann Arbor and the immediate region. 
  • Detroit Cultivator (all) : is a multi-disciplinary effort to transform the six-acre Oakland Avenue Urban Farm into an experimental urban prototype for equitable regeneration. The plan combines agricultural production, cultural activity, business incubation, and ecological stewardship to envision a neo-rural landscape that is both economically and ecologically sustainable. There are over 1300 urban farms in Detroit: some covering 40 acres and operating at an industrial scale, others converting a single lot into a resource just for a few families. While most would agree to the substantive benefits of urban agriculture, few initiatives have evolved into sustainable models for ecological diversification, economic resurgence, and infrastructural efficiency. We are working with the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm on a plan to unifying the site into an operational (agri)cultural landscape.
College of Engineering
  • Engineering OnRamp (Community): The Engineering OnRamp (EO) serves as a pathway for a diverse group of K-12 students to discover engineering as a profession and choose the U-M College of Engineering as the place where they want to prepare for their future.  We do this through year-round activities ranging from one-day experiences to full immersion residential summer camps.
  • North Campus Dean’s MLK Spirit Awards (Students, Staff, Faculty): This annual north campus event is hosted by the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, the College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, School of Music, Theatre & Dance in conjunction with ArtsEngine and the Duderstadt Center as part of the University of Michigan’s MLK Symposium to honor and commemorate the life and legacy of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • The Michigan Engineering Zone (community): Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are shaping the future of the global economy. To position Detroit on the global stage, the MEZ aims to educate and inspire Detroit’s youth to become leaders in transforming their city, schools and communities through science and technology.
School of Music, Theatre & Dance
  • Crescendo Detroit: (Community & Students) A partnership with the Music Education department and our Office of Engagement and Outreach  with Detroit based music program, Crescendo Detroit
  • Seven Mile Music: (Community) Founded by an SMTD student, Seven Mile partners with Mission City and Brightmoor Detroit community leaders to bring music education programming to youth. Now mainly led by non-SMTD students, but still partially funded by SMTD with involvement from SMTD students in leadership roles. This also includes the free summer camp in Brightmoor for youth ages 4-16.
Staff
Women of Color Task Force

Women of Color Task Force (staff): A staff organization that provides professional development, networking, and training opportunities for employees, with a focus on addressing the needs of women of color staff.

School of Social Work
  • ENGAGE: DETROIT (Faculty/Staff/Students): The ENGAGE: DETROIT Initiative exists to identify nodes of strength, highlight faculty research, celebrate student achievements, and promote class-related projects and service in the city of Detroit. Faculty, staff, and students contribute their expertise, time, and other resources to support the ongoing efforts of Detroiters and community-based organizations to strengthen their neighborhoods and improve the quality of life for residents of the city. The initiative also features an event that celebrates and showcases student engagement in Detroit. During the event, students network and build relationships with community organizations, leaders, activists, elected officials, and others in the community.
School of Public Policy
  • Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Program (Community/Faculty/Student/Staff): The Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Project (DNEP) is dedicated to promoting sustainable economic and community development in Detroit by providing technical and strategic consulting services to neighborhood-based entrepreneurs and small businesses. DNEP was founded in 2016. By engaging the University of Michigan students, faculty, and staff, we provide solutions to the complex needs of our Detroit-based clients.
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
  • Detroit Cultivator (all) : is a multi-disciplinary effort to transform the six-acre Oakland Avenue Urban Farm into an experimental urban prototype for equitable regeneration. The plan combines agricultural production, cultural activity, business incubation, and ecological stewardship to envision a neo-rural landscape that is both economically and ecologically sustainable. There are over 1300 urban farms in Detroit: some covering 40 acres and operating at an industrial scale, others converting a single lot into a resource just for a few families. While most would agree to the substantive benefits of urban agriculture, few initiatives have evolved into sustainable models for ecological diversification, economic resurgence, and infrastructural efficiency. We are working with the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm on a plan to unifying the site into an operational (agri)cultural landscape.
College of Engineering
  • North Campus Dean’s MLK Spirit Awards (Students, Staff, Faculty): This annual north campus event is hosted by the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, the College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, School of Music, Theatre & Dance in conjunction with ArtsEngine and the Duderstadt Center as part of the University of Michigan’s MLK Symposium to honor and commemorate the life and legacy of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Students
Black Celebratory

Black Celebratory (Students): Black Celebratory is an event that celebrates the commonalities and differences that characterize the experiences of African/African American graduates at the University of Michigan.

Clements Library Fellowships for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in American History

Clements Library Fellowships for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in American History (Student): Fellowships for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in American History support research at the Clements Library by affiliates of Historically Black Colleges and Universities who are undertaking a research project that examines topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion or who demonstrate a commitment to diversity in the field of American History. The awards are based largely on the significance of the Clements’ collection to the applicant’s research. Grants are for $1,500 and require a minimum visit of one week.

Graham Sustainability Institute
  • Urban and Community Studies I (Student): This course is designed to help students develop historical perspectives and analytical frameworks that will guide them as they study and work in urban communities. Focusing on the collective experience of African Americans in the second half of the twentieth century, we will conduct an interdisciplinary investigation into the processes of community formation and social change impacting contemporary urban life. Course texts, therefore, include historical studies, urban sociology, social work, autobiography, ethnography, community studies, and film. We will begin with a review of the various meanings and uses of the idea of “community,” moving next to a brief consideration of the historical development of American cities. Then we will explore the processes of African American migration and urbanization, including the exploration of specific urban areas and their dynamics of community formation. Finally, we will examine case studies of community organizing, leading us to consider broad questions concerning our understanding of contemporary urban communities, the challenges they face, and the prospects for engaged social action. Our guiding concern throughout the academic term will be the relationship between universities and their surrounding communities—including the historical expressions, contemporary realities, and future prospects of this relationship. This is the one required course for the Urban Studies minor.
  • Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health (Student): This course will explore the intersections of health, gender, and race by focusing on the epidemic of  HIV and the epidemic of violence in the African American community.  Students will explore the theory and practice surrounding an intervention module on HIV prevention and violence.
Institute for Social Research

Institute for Social Research (Community/Students/Faculty):

  • Hanes Walton, Jr. Endowment for Graduate Study in Racial and Ethnic Politics (Student): Intended to support the professional development of the recipient’s research career, the stipend may be used for travel-related to data collection, academic collaborations, or conference participation; summer courses at the Survey Research Center Summer Institute or the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research Summer Program; pilot research for a dissertation; or the purchase of research-related equipment.
  • RacismLab (Student): The toxicity of racism has long been understood by communities of color. With the growth of camera phones and social media, there has been a rapid growth in the public documentation and discussion of racism in the US. Within the University community, there is a growing interest across multiple disciplines to systematically document the linkages between racism and social, economic, political, and health-related resources and constraints. Nevertheless, there continues to be a lack of clarity about the ways in which racism affects the lives of people of color, making intervention challenging. This lack of clarity stems from little integration of scientific knowledge and collaboration across disciplines to foster sophisticated theory development and hypothesis testing. Therefore, we have created a transdisciplinary research collective to bring together doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows, and faculty to develop innovative theoretical frameworks and empirical approaches to better understand the impact of racism on health and well-being (very broadly defined).
  • Center for Inequality Dynamics (Faculty, Students): CID is an open and multidisciplinary research center, bringing together students and faculty from a variety of fields, including sociology, economics, public policy, social work, philosophy, education, and others. It pursues cutting-edge research and innovative teaching on one of the central societal challenges of our time: social inequality. 
Summer Bridge Scholars Program

Summer Bridge Scholars Program (Students): A supportive community to assist scholars in transitioning to the University of Michigan. It is limited to a select group of students each year. The program offers intensive academic preparation, highly individualized academic advising, and the personal attention of faculty in an intensive, yet nurturing environment during the summer. Scholars have an excellent opportunity to strengthen their academic skills, develop a peer support network, and to familiarize themselves with the campus and its resources.  

Stamps in Color

Stamps in Color (Student): Stamps is Color is a group of artists, designers, and creatives of color whose mission is to increase the creative, social, and professional opportunities for students, graduates, and faculty of color at the Stamps School of Art and Design. They aim to connect members with professionals, including those of color or minority, while fostering the creative growth and personal development of the Black community of Stamps in particular through lectures, meetings, exhibits, excursions, community service, artistic and visual activism in times of social injustice, as well as through projects that will engage the greater University with the Stamps School of Art and Design.

School of Education
  • The School at Marygrove (external community, students, faculty): a P-20 collaboration with Detroit Public Schools serves the Detroit community as well as novice teachers from the U-M School of Education.
  • School of Education & Detroit School of Arts Partnership (external community, faculty): The Detroit Public Schools and the University of Michigan work as partners to support and enhance new and ongoing arts programming at Detroit School of Arts.
Summer Youth Dialogues

Summer Youth Dialogues (community and students): Summer Youth Dialogues, sponsored by the Program on Intergroup Relations, “increases dialogue among high school age youth in metropolitan Detroit, the nation’s most segregated metropolitan area. Young people of African, Asian, European, Latinx/a/o, and Middle Eastern descent participate in structured dialogues, metropolitan tour, campus retreat, and community projects that increase dialogue, challenge discrimination, and create change”.

Student Life
  • Student Life Programs
    • Supporting Incoming Black Students (SIBS) – Mentoring Program – MESA: A mentoring program that focuses on enhancing student’s cultural capital by connecting incoming first-year students to peer mentors and through monthly programs that bring them together for community building, empowerment,  and discussion of various issues that affect the Black community.
    • Diversity Peer Educator Programs: Diversity Peer Educators are embedded Housing student staff whose sole focus is to deliver on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion programming and providing peer-led education and climate support.
    • Trotter Multicultural Center (Students): The center serves as an iconic and programmatic symbol for all students, as an open and inclusive facility that fosters intercultural engagement and strengthens connections between and among communities, as a supportive home and environment to those committed to social justice and diversity, and as a space that celebrates the tradition and history of the Trotter Multicultural Center and the activism of students.
  • Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs (MESA) (students) MESA was founded in 1970 in response to the Black Action Movement (BAM) at U-M. MESA offers consultations to students and student organizations where critical race and ethnicity perspectives are taken into consideration in the planning and coordinating of events. Its philosophy of advising is grounded in student ownership, empowerment, and accountability. Its  inspiration comes from the following frameworks:
    • A grassroots leadership model that interconnects and bridges difference to enable sustainable change in marginalized communities;
    • Social Change Leadership model that focuses on personal, group, and community change;
  • Multicultural Lounges: (students) Intentional programming done in the multicultural lounges named after Black and African American Community Activists or Culture to celebrate and provide support for the Black and African American community through programs and events open to all interested students. Below is a list of those lounges where events are hosted to honor the activist or community.
Success Connects

SuccessConnects (Students): A holistic support program focused on ensuring students’ academic, personal, and social success at Michigan. It promotes opportunities to excel in the undergraduate experience, ranging from networking and professional development to study skills and study abroad opportunities, while giving students a community of scholars and leaders amongst whom they can thrive.

School of Social Work
  • Community-Based Initiative (CBI) in Detroit (Student): The Community-Based Initiative (CBI) in Detroit trains and supports a new generation of social workers dedicated to community and social change in urban cities, neighborhoods, and communities. This is done through coursework and field placements based in Detroit and surrounding areas including Highland Park, Hamtramck, and Dearborn. Upon graduation, CBI scholars work as community organizers, policymakers, program planners, organization managers and administrators, evaluators, and foundation staff within Michigan, the US, and internationally. Up to 12 incoming students who are genuinely committed to community-based work in urban areas will be selected for the CBI program.
  • Detroit Clinical Scholars (DCS) Program (Student): The Detroit Clinical Scholars Program prepares MSW students to work with, in particular, underserved racial and ethnic minority children, adolescents, and transitional age youth living with physical and behavioral health conditions. The SSW, in collaboration with the Detroit Wayne Integrated Health Network, will provide a specialized inter-professional behavioral health education and training program. The Detroit Clinical Scholars Program addresses a critical need for more community-based mental and behavioral health clinicians serving, among others,  racial and ethnic minority children, adolescents, and/or transitional age youth living in underserved, urban areas. Detroit Clinical Scholars will be uniquely prepared for positions in integrated behavioral health and primary care, mental health and behavioral health settings, hospitals, health departments, health agencies, schools, or nonprofit agencies.
  • Culturally-Responsive Practice with African American Communities: Prevention and intervention strategies with racial microaggressions SW659 (Student): Distrust based on a history of unsatisfactory experiences with human service professionals and low retention in, and premature termination of services can reduce successful outcomes for members of African American communities. Participants in this course will examine racial microaggressions in practice as a source of these outcomes. Participants will define and identify racial microaggressions and their impact on clients and on the professional relationship. Attention will be given to the cultural context in the way racial microaggressions are experienced and dilemmas about how to respond. The effect of power differentials on the interpretation of racial microaggressions will be examined. Using an African-centered perspective, the course will be knowledge-, skills-, and values-based and will include assigned readings, PowerPoint presentations, video clips, case studies, and small-group presence of problem-solving. Participants will practice alternative methods of intervening when in the racial microaggressions. 
  • ENGAGE: DETROIT (Faculty/Staff/Students): The ENGAGE: DETROIT Initiative exists to identify nodes of strength, highlight faculty research, celebrate student achievements, and promote class-related projects and service in the city of Detroit. Faculty, staff, and students contribute their expertise, time, and other resources to support the ongoing efforts of Detroiters and community-based organizations to strengthen their neighborhoods and improve the quality of life for residents of the city. The initiative also features an event that celebrates and showcases student engagement in Detroit. During the event, students network and build relationships with community organizations, leaders, activists, elected officials, and others in the community.
  • HRSA Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care Clinical MSW Scholars Program (Student): The program aims to improve the availability of integrated behavioral health and primary care services with individuals across the life-span living with behavioral health challenges in medically underserved communities. The HRSA Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care Trainees Program addresses a critical need for more clinicians to work with adults with substance use disorders (SUD) and psychiatric disabilities, as well as racial and ethnic minority children, adolescents, and transitional age youth living with behavioral health difficulties and SUD in the Detroit and Wayne County community. By completing the HRSA Integrated Behavioral Health and Primary Care Program, students will be prepared to work in behavioral health clinical positions in integrated health, primary care, mental health and behavioral health settings, hospitals, health departments, health agencies, schools, or nonprofit agencies.
  • New Leaders in African-Centered Social Work (Student): The NLACSW Scholars Program enhances practice preparation by engaging students in culturally-specific and affirmative curricular and training experiences for service to Black/African Americans. The NLACSW program will accept incoming students who are genuinely committed to gaining skills and knowledge for culturally-responsive social work practice in and with Black/African American communities. This program is open to students in all pathways.
School of Dentistry

School of Dentistry

  • Profile for Success (Student): Profile for Success is a six-week residential program. The purpose of Profile for Success (PFS) is to assist junior and senior-level college students and recent graduates through the admissions process for dental school. Program participants will also have an opportunity to increase their knowledge of career opportunities within dentistry.
School of Public Policy
  • Public Policy & International Affairs (PPIA): The Public Policy and International Affairs Program (PPIA) works to promote the inclusion and full participation of underrepresented groups in public service and to advance their leadership roles throughout our civic institutions serving domestic and international affairs.
  • David Bohnett Foundation Leadership and Public Service Fellowships (Student): The Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy is pleased to offer the David Bohnett Foundation Leadership and Public Service Fellowship, generously funded by University of Michigan alumnus David Bohnett (MBA ’80). The fellowships are competitively awarded to three incoming master’s students each year, and offer two years of in-state tuition support and a funded internship in the City of Detroit Mayor’s Office, working directly with a group executive on the mayor’s policy priorities.
  • History & Future of Detroit PUBPOL 466 (Student): No large American city grew more rapidly than Detroit from 1900 to the 1930s.  Thanks to Henry Ford and automobile manufacturing,  Detroit became the prosperous axis mundi of the world vehicle industry.  After World War II, Detroit seemed poised to continue growing.  In 1947, there were 325 manufacturing plants in the city.  Many of those factories were old so firms built modern ones in the suburbs.  The federal government subsidized home building in this era so, at very low cost, whites but not African Americans could easily buy an attractive suburban home.  The city’s population began to fall in 1950.  Retail trade followed the migration to the suburbs.  By 1990, racial attitudes had changed and African Americans moved in great numbers from the city to the suburbs.  By 2010, the city’s population was only 38% of what it was in 1950.  Detroit lost its tax base and, in 2012, entered bankruptcy.
  • Strategic Public Policy Consulting (Student): Strategic Public Policy Consulting (SPPC) is an opportunity for students to conduct a faculty-supervised consulting project for public, private, or non-profit sector policy organization at the local, state, national or international level. Projects range widely in policy area, level of quantitative analysis required, size, and complexity. All projects culminate in the publication of a final report and an oral presentation to the client.
  • Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Program (Community/Faculty/Student/Staff): The Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Project (DNEP) is dedicated to promoting sustainable economic and community development in Detroit by providing technical and strategic consulting services to neighborhood-based entrepreneurs and small businesses. DNEP was founded in 2016. By engaging the University of Michigan students, faculty, and staff, we provide solutions to the complex needs of our Detroit-based clients.
  • Practical Policy Engagement (P3E) (Student/Faculty): The Practical Policy Engagement Program is a university-wide resource housed at the Ford School where it can leverage existing expertise and interdisciplinary approaches to generate policy-relevant research, analysis, and learning, as well as improvements in organizational practice.
School of Public Health
  • Summer Enrichment Program (student) UM SEP is a summer internship program for undergraduates that attracts and educates future leaders who are committed to addressing racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic health inequalities. Since the program’s inception in 1986, more than 90% of its participants have completed graduate study in public health, medicine, health sciences, and business.
  • Future Public Health Leaders Program (student) (Michigan FPHLP) is a residential summer program funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Through field placements, skill building workshops and mentorship, Michigan FPHLP provides students with opportunities for growth, learning and awareness in the field of public health. The ultimate goal of the program is to increase the diversity of the public health workforce and the people committed to reducing health disparities.
  • Public Health Students of African Descent (PHSAD) (student) PHSAD is a student organization, open to all interested Public Health students, whose mission includes providing an atmosphere of excellence in Public Health for students of African Descent. Eradicating discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender or creed within the School of Public Health is part of PHSAD’s purpose. PHSAD hosts an Annual Minority Health Conference.
Rackham Graduate School

Rackham Graduate School

  • Summer Research Opportunity Program (SROP) and Michigan Humanities Emerging Research Scholars (MICHHERS) (students) program were both originally designed as anti-racist interventions, countering issues of structural racism by providing access to educational opportunities for URM students, specifically.  The programs now enroll students from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. 
  • Bouchet Graduate Honor Society (students) was designed as an anti-racist intervention to increase the number of faculty members from URM backgrounds. Founded by Howard and Yale, it is an explicitly anti-racist initiative for campuses across the country; at UM, students are selected based on their commitment to DEI. 
  • Rackham Merit Fellows (RMF) (students) program was an anti-racist intervention in its original design, as it sought to directly counter issues of structural racism by providing full funding to URM doctoral students. The RMF program is now open to students from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds but continues its focus on addressing cultural, educational, and economic underrepresentation
  • Bridges-to-the-Doctorate (students) was originally conceived as an anti-racist initiative and now broadly enrolls students from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. 
  • Faculty Allies & Student Allies Grant Competition (faculty, students) awardees do DEI and anti-racism work.
  • Creating Connection Consortium (C3) (faculty) Along with institutions like UC Berkeley, Columbia, and the University of Chicago, Rackham belongs to C3, a Mellon Foundation-funded consortium that aims to increase diverse participation in graduate studies in order to diversify the pipeline of future faculty members.
  • LEADING EQUITY AND DIVERSITY (L.E.A.D.) (students, faculty, community) Rackham will be offering one webinar a month in an ongoing program to invite conscious leading in higher education.
  • MSI Collaboration and Implementation Grants (students): Support U-M graduate and professional programs and serve to establish and strengthen existing relationships with MSIs. MSI Collaboration and Implementation Grants should build upon ongoing, mutually beneficial collaborations with MSIs in order to recruit and enroll students from MSI partner institutions into U-M graduate and professional programs.
  • SCOR (Students): Students of Color of Rackham is a network for Rackham students dedicated to the social, cultural, and academic well-being of students of color of African, Asian, Latino, and Native American descent. The organization, which includes students of other cultures, ethnicities, and international origins, promotes, supports, and sponsors efforts concerning the improvement of quality in our students’ academic, professional, and social lives respectful of cultural differences, disabilities, gender, and sexual orientation.
  • The Detroit School (Students, Community, Faculty):Since 2015, the “Detroit School” series has continued on as a Rackham Interdisciplinary Workshop. The workshop invites experts and researchers from around the country to share their experiences in and in-progress research on Detroit and cities facing similar disinvestment and decline. The workshops have included panel discussions on what it means to “Teach Detroit” in higher education classrooms, book launches for Rebecca Kinney, Amy Haimerl, and Tiya Miles, a symposium on how Michigan cities are positioning themselves for the next century, and talks on community-based design and avenues to maintain residents’ rights to the city. The workshop also organizes doctoral student writing workshops for students writing dissertations on Detroit.”
Law School

Law School 

  • Michigan Access Program (MAP) (student) is an innovative social justice leadership program at the University of Michigan Law School that utilizes social justice curricula, experiential learning models, and inter-group dialogues to offer students from a range of social identities, who plan to serve historically underrepresented communities disproportionately impacted by inequalities in the law, a resource for living, learning, and thriving in Law School.
  • Michigan Law African American Alumni Reunion (student) The Law School supports the Michigan Law African American Alumni Reunion, which coincides with the annual Alden J. “Butch” Carpenter Memorial Scholarship Gala, and is held on Michigan Law’s Preview Weekend for admitted students. Reunion is a full weekend event designed to create a bridge from past alumni to current students and on to future incoming students.
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
  • Detroit Community Partnership Center at Taubman College (faculty and students): Supports student and faculty projects that address community-identified needs and advance the education and knowledge building mission of the University of Michigan. Projects aim to support the work of Detroit community leaders and city officials who are working to strengthen neighborhoods in Detroit. Community organizing helped stabilize neighborhoods after the mortgage crisis- U-SNAP-BAC, Vacant Property Task Force of the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation.
  • Taubman College Pathways (Students):  The mission of the Taubman College Pathways program is to create pathways to diversify the Taubman College student population and the fields of architecture, urban planning, and urban design. Our goal is to expand the diversity of our College and disciplines in as many ways as possible, including but not limited to socioeconomic status, educational experiences, race/ethnicity, etc.
  • Detroit Cultivator (all): is a multi-disciplinary effort to transform the six-acre Oakland Avenue Urban Farm into an experimental urban prototype for equitable regeneration. The plan combines agricultural production, cultural activity, business incubation, and ecological stewardship to envision a neo-rural landscape that is both economically and ecologically sustainable. There are over 1300 urban farms in Detroit: some covering 40 acres and operating at an industrial scale, others converting a single lot into a resource just for a few families. While most would agree to the substantive benefits of urban agriculture, few initiatives have evolved into sustainable models for ecological diversification, economic resurgence, and infrastructural efficiency. We are working with the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm on a plan to unifying the site into an operational (agri)cultural landscape.
College of Engineering
  • North Campus Dean’s MLK Spirit Awards (Students, Staff, Faculty): This annual north campus event is hosted by the Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, the College of Engineering, Stamps School of Art & Design, School of Music, Theatre & Dance in conjunction with ArtsEngine and the Duderstadt Center as part of the University of Michigan’s MLK Symposium to honor and commemorate the life and legacy of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • MEngin (students): M-Engin is the Michigan Engineering specific learning community within the university’s M-STEM Academies. Students commit to a two-year program which begins with a six-week summer transition program. Over the two years, students have access to customized advising, career guidance, learning enrichment activities, mentoring, and assistance in obtaining a paid professional summer internship or research opportunity.
  • NextProf Future Faculty Workshops(students): The mission of NextProf is to diversify the face of academia by educating a broad spectrum of candidates about the pathways to an academic career, enabling them with the tools needed to be successful, and energizing them with the motivation to do so.
  • ScholarPOWER (students): ScholarPOWER is a key component of CEDO’s mission to help students advance and excel at every level. ScholarPOWER is a comprehensive suite of educational support services designed to build community and academic, cultural, personal, and professional development.
  • MI-LSAMP (students): The Michigan Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (MI-LSAMP) was launched in November 2005 with a grant from the National Science Foundation. The MI-LSAMP partners the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, Wayne State University and Western Michigan in an effort to significantly increase the number of underrepresented minority students earning baccalaureate degrees in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and prepare them for entry into graduate programs. 
School of Music, Theatre & Dance
  • Detroit Symphony Orchestra Internship (Student): Be a part of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra’s Community and Learning team! You will gain hands-on experience with all aspects of our department. From the DSO’s Educational Concert Series to Community Engagement and our Training Programs, this experience is one to never forget. The selected student will receive a stipend to help offset the travel costs associated with this internship.
  • Crescendo Detroit: (Community & Students) A partnership with the Music Education department and our Office of Engagement and Outreach  with Detroit based music program, Crescendo Detroit
  • PEERs (Performance Engagement Educational Residencies) (Students): Now in its fourth academic year, the program provides mini-grants as well as logistical and programmatic support that allow SMTD students to partner with underserved communities throughout Michigan to create mutually beneficial arts experiences. Every project must include some element of performance and some element of education, and SMTD students must return to the community at least twice. 
Literature, Sciences & Arts (LSA)

Department of African and African American Studies (Students): Established in 1970, the now-Department of Afroamerican and African Studies (DAAS) is an interdisciplinary program of research, instruction, and community outreach. Its intellectual focus and mission are to reflect on and participate in determining emerging directions in the study and representation of the diverse cultures, experiences, and societies of Africans and peoples of African descent across the African continent and diaspora.

Summer Bridge Scholars Program (Students): A supportive community to assist scholars in transitioning to the University of Michigan. It is limited to a select group of students each year. The program offers intensive academic preparation, highly individualized academic advising, and the personal attention of faculty in an intensive, yet nurturing environment during the summer. Scholars have an excellent opportunity to strengthen their academic skills, develop a peer support network, and to familiarize themselves with the campus and its resources.  

All
Detroit Center

Detroit Center: (all): The center is a gateway for University and urban communities to mutually enrich each other through service, education, research, and cultural exchange.  The facility accommodates research projects and outreach initiatives while also offering space for an increasing number of University programs involving Detroit citizens and organizations. The facility includes offices and space for meetings, exhibitions, lectures, collaborative work, and more while serving as a home base for students and faculty working on projects in Detroit.

Institute for Social Research

Institute for Social Research:

MLK Symposium

MLK Symposium (All): One of the largest celebrations of the life and legacy of MLK sponsored by colleges and universities in the nation. Throughout the entire month of January, the MLK Symposium provides the community with over 40 opportunities to participate in lectures, live performances, exhibits, workshops, and community service projects sponsored by academic and non-academic units, student and staff organizations, and community groups.

New Negress Film Society

New Negress Film Society/NNFS (All): The New Negress Film Society is a core collective of black women filmmakers whose priority is to create community and spaces for support, exhibition, and consciousness-raising. The NNFS was originally formed out of a need to create a community in an industry where black women’s voices and stories are often suppressed. They aim to raise awareness and understanding of our challenges within the film world. This ranges from interesting behind-the-scenes media to reflective vlogs, to artist spotlights showcasing their recent successes. NNFS regularly interviews black women who work in the filmmaking community to highlight their unique stories.

Wolverine Express

Wolverine Express (all): Wolverine Express takes faculty, staff, students, and alumni from the University of Michigan to under-resourced high schools across the state to promote higher education through sharing their stories of aspiration, education, and career experiences.

School of Public Policy
  • Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Program (Community/Faculty/Student/Staff): The Detroit Neighborhood Entrepreneurs Project (DNEP) is dedicated to promoting sustainable economic and community development in Detroit by providing technical and strategic consulting services to neighborhood-based entrepreneurs and small businesses. DNEP was founded in 2016. By engaging the University of Michigan students, faculty, and staff, we provide solutions to the complex needs of our Detroit-based clients.
School of Dentistry

School of Dentistry

  • Annual Student National Dental Association King’s Feast (All): An annual event that honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The event includes a banquet-style dinner accompanied by a guest speaker and music. Attendees connect with past, present, and future members of the SNDA chapter, network with UMICH SOD alumni, faculty, and staff.
  • Multicultural Affairs Committee (All): The Multicultural Affairs Committee is composed of students, faculty, and staff from the School of Dentistry with the purpose of promoting diversity and planning activities that celebrate different cultures.
Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning
  • Detroit Cultivator (all): is a multi-disciplinary effort to transform the six-acre Oakland Avenue Urban Farm into an experimental urban prototype for equitable regeneration. The plan combines agricultural production, cultural activity, business incubation, and ecological stewardship to envision a neo-rural landscape that is both economically and ecologically sustainable. There are over 1300 urban farms in Detroit: some covering 40 acres and operating at an industrial scale, others converting a single lot into a resource just for a few families. While most would agree to the substantive benefits of urban agriculture, few initiatives have evolved into sustainable models for ecological diversification, economic resurgence, and infrastructural efficiency. We are working with the Oakland Avenue Urban Farm on a plan to unifying the site into an operational (agri)cultural landscape.
MESA

Anti-Racism Peer-Led Teach-In: Racial justice begins with anti-racism. Anti-racism is the active process of identifying and eliminating racism by changing systems, organizational structures, policies, practices, and attitudes so that power is redistributed and shared equitably (University of Calgary). This peer-led teach-in will engage analytical frameworks for examining systemic cultural, social, economic, and political forces in the community along with individual reflection. Our hope is to raise critical consciousness, understand the opportunity for actions, and how our resources can be distributed.