| Strategic Plan | Annual DEI Summit

Summit Events

To have your diversity, equity and inclusion-related event featured on this page, contact diversitymatters@umich.edu.

Featured Events

  • Oct 8

    DEI Summit 2018 Community Assembly & Discussion

    9:00am10:30amPower Center

    Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

    Remarks by President Mark S. Schlissel, Vice Provost & Chief Diversity Officer Robert M. Sellers, and other senior leaders. Featuring keynote conversation with Diane Guerrero, moderated by Leonard Pitts, Jr.

     

  • Oct 8

    Social Transformation through Public Engagement

    2:00pm3:30pmPalmer Commons, Forum Hall

    LSA - National Center for Institutional Diversity, Academic Innovation, and Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

    Leaders from different sectors discuss partnerships with higher education to inform and implement social change. President Mark S. Schlissel will share remarks on the intersection between two Presidential initiatives: Public Engagement & Impact and Diversity, Equity & Inclusion.

  • Oct 8

    Promoting Equity and Inclusion: Eliminating Sexual Misconduct at U-M

    3:30pm5:00pmGraduate Hotel, Terrace Ballroom

    Human Resources

    Engage with university leaders in a panel discussion on fulfilling our shared responsibility to ensure a safe, equitable and respectful community.

  • Oct 10

    Student Life Design Thinking Event for Campus Climate Initiatives

    6:30pm9:00pmWeiser Hall, 10th floor

    Student Life

    A student-driven design thinking session for campus climate initiatives.

  • Oct 12

    Voices of the Staff – Me, “The Other” Screening and Conversation

    12:00pm2:00pmAngell Hall – Auditorium B (Central Campus)

    UM Human Resources: Voices of the Staff and LSA: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Culture Office

    Private screening of Me, the “Other”, a documentary film about a diverse group of students living in Washtenaw County in Southeast Michigan. “We set out to tell stories of prejudice, equality and diversity and discovered that ‘otherness’ is never one thing.” The film screening will be followed up by a conversation with cast, crew and a small Diversity Panel.

    Register for a screening here.

     

  • Oct 12

    Voices of the Staff – Me, “The Other” Screening and Conversation

    3:00pm5:00pmTowsley Center–Dow Auditorium (Medical Campus)

    UM Human Resources: Voices of the Staff and LSA: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Culture Office

    Private screening of Me, the “Other”, a documentary film about a diverse group of students living in Washtenaw County in Southeast Michigan. “We set out to tell stories of prejudice, equality and diversity and discovered that ‘otherness’ is never one thing.” The film screening will be followed up by a conversation with cast, crew and a small Diversity Panel.

    Register for a screening here.

Additional Unit Sponsored Events

  • Sep 26

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am5:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Sep 27

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am7:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Sep 28

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am7:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Sep 29

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am5:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Sep 30

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am5:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Oct 1

    Sexual Harassment in Engineering

    3:30pm5:00pmStamps Auditorium, Walgreen Drama Center

    College of Engineering

    Welcome by Alec D. Gallimore, Robert J. Vlasic Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Michigan

    Report Overview

    Panelists: Gilda A. Barabino,* Daniel and Frances Berg Professor and Dean, Grove School of Engineering, City College of New York Alec D. Gallimore, Robert J. Vlasic Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Michigan Allison Steiner, Associate Professor of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, University of Michigan

  • Oct 2

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am5:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Oct 3

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am5:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.

  • Oct 3

    Accessibility for WordPress

    12:00pm1:00pmISR-Thompson, Room 1430

    Institute for Social Research

    So you want to make an accessible WordPress website? Congratulations – your site will be available to the widest possible audience! At the presentation you will learn about the tools for testing your WordPress website for accessibility compliance and about the ways to make an accessible WordPress website.

    Register here.

  • Oct 4

    Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire – An Exhibit

    11:00am7:00pmStamps Gallery, 201 S. Division St., Ann Arbor

    University Library

    Have We Met: Dialogues on Memory and Desire draws inspiration from Ann Arbor’s legacy of social movements (Anti-War Movement, Civil Rights Movements) and experimental art practices (The Once Group) from the late-1950s to the 1970s as its point of departure. It brings together archival materials and reproductions from U-M Library’s Labadie Collection and the Bentley Library in conjunction with radical artworks by diverse, multi-generational artists and designers whose works are deeply influenced by the ideas of freedom and self-determination; re-writing the canonical accounts of history; and building contemporary culture and solidarity through collective action.

    At a time when the idea of citizenship in the United States is being deeply challenged and redefined through horrific occurrences of gun violence and police brutality towards racialized and queer civilians and refugees, this exhibition asks what role art institutions can play in building inclusive and vibrant creative spaces the 21st Century. Have We Met? Dialogues on Memory and Desire retraces and learns from models of collectivity and organizing mobilized by artists, designers, and cultural producers in the past and present as a lens to understand the contemporary moment and re-imagine the future. It explores the complex relationships and at times overlapping and contested concerns between contemporary art, design, and social justice that continually influence and inform one another.

    Curated by Srimoyee Mitra.